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Thursday, September 11 • 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Simulating the Universe using modern C++

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What is the link between C++11/14, parallelism and the open question of the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe ? Answer: numerical cosmology and all the techniques to make the best out of supercomputers to shed a new light on unsolved problem in physics. In this talk, I will present the numerical lessons coming from the Full Universe Run, a numerical experiment realized in 2012 on the entire Curie thin-nodes Supercomputer to simulate the evolution of cosmological structures during the last 13.7 billion years. I will focus on how this experiment has changed our view on software design in astrophysics and how we started to implement new approaches using C++11, template metaprogramming, constant expressions and std::thread in order to maximize both genericity and performance. I will also discuss optimization issues related to data locality, cache efficiency and spatial trees which are extensively used in our domain. I will also try to give some inputs on the cultural challenges raised by the introduction of C++11/14 in our domain. This talk will be concluded by thoughts on the needs of computational physicists and how C++17 may help us to solve some of the open problems we are currently facing.

Speakers
avatar for Vincent Reverdy

Vincent Reverdy

Astrophysicist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Vincent has been working as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA) since he obtained his PhD at the Paris observatory (France) in november 2014. His main scientific interests are related to cosmology and general relativity. He his particularly interested in the study of relativistic effects at cosmological scales using high performance simulations run on supercomputers. Because these simulations rely on... Read More →


Thursday September 11, 2014 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Gauss

Attendees (32)