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Monday, September 8
 

8:30pm PDT

Boost Library Writers Workshop, Part 1

There would be two types of attendees - library authors and observers.

a) Each library author would make a very short presentation (3 min) of what the library attempts to accomplish.  To be eligible, a library must have documentation.

b) Authors draw lots to select a library other than their own.  Observers are also permitted to draw lots or just select a library they might be interested.

c) Each selected library is “critiqued” by investigating the library and keeping a contemporaneous log on the experience.  I’ll prepare a place where these critiques can be posted. 

d) I will be available to answer questions and provide encouragement.  Hopefully I can convince another boost author to show up.

So the timing would be:

8:30 - short introduction by me to describe the rules above.

8:35 - author presentations - assume 7

9:00 - drawing of lots - critique period begins

(9:15 - first session ends, second session begins in the same room, some attendees may switch sessions)

10:00 - pencils down - wrap up.

If there is demand, this session could be repeated subsequent evenings.


Speakers
avatar for Robert Ramey

Robert Ramey

Software Developer, RRSD
Robert Ramey is a freelance Software Developer living in Santa Barbara, California. (See www.rrsd.com.)  His long and varied career spans various aspects of software development including business data processing, product, embedded systems, custom software, and C++ library development. Lately, he has been mostly interested in C++ library design and implementation related to Boost... Read More →


Monday September 8, 2014 8:30pm - 9:15pm PDT
Descartes

8:30pm PDT

Mixins
"Inheritance is the base class of evil" - Sean Parent
Roger, copy that! But sometimes I really want my classes to "import" data members or functions which are better organized elsewhere. And I can do a lot with single inheritance, multiple inheritance, variadic inheritance. Awesome. But when I want to be decent and use composition?
  • I have to know how many members I want to add in advance. There is no variadic composition.
  • I have to decide on the names of those members in advance. There is no compile time way of choosing a name.
  • And if I want my class to offer methods of those members, I have to write forwarding functions and need to know the name of those methods in advance. If the interface of the member changes, my forwarding functions are likely to be broken.
Composition is quite limited when compared to inheritance. That's why we use inheritance so much, especially with templates.

I'll give a few examples, including a real-life case of variadic CRTP and an inheritance-based way of how to specify the names of your data members via template parameters. After that, I'll open the discussion by suggesting two conceptually simple language features and how they could improve our life:
  • Mixin classes
  • Name providers (still looking for a better name).

Speakers
avatar for Roland Bock

Roland Bock

Principal Software Engineer, PPRO Financial Ltd
From my days at the university, I hold a PHD in physics (although that was in the previous century and seems like a different life by now). Ever since then I have been developing software and/or managing engineering teams. In 2008, I started to learn C++ because I could not believe... Read More →


Monday September 8, 2014 8:30pm - 9:15pm PDT
Newton

9:15pm PDT

Boost Library Writers Workshop, Part 2

There would be two types of attendees - library authors and observers.

a) Each library author would make a very short presentation (3 min) of what the library attempts to accomplish.  To be eligible, a library must have documentation.

b) Authors draw lots to select a library other than their own.  Observers are also permitted to draw lots or just select a library they might be interested.

c) Each selected library is “critiqued” by investigating the library and keeping a contemporaneous log on the experience.  I’ll prepare a place where these critiques can be posted. 

d) I will be available to answer questions and provide encouragement.  Hopefully I can convince another boost author to show up.

So the timing would be:

8:30 - short introduction by me to describe the rules above.

8:35 - author presentations - assume 7

9:00 - drawing of lots - critique period begins

(9:15 - first session ends, second session begins in the same room, some attendees may switch sessions)

10:00 - pencils down - wrap up.

If there is demand, this session could be repeated subsequent evenings.


Speakers
avatar for Robert Ramey

Robert Ramey

Software Developer, RRSD
Robert Ramey is a freelance Software Developer living in Santa Barbara, California. (See www.rrsd.com.)  His long and varied career spans various aspects of software development including business data processing, product, embedded systems, custom software, and C++ library development. Lately, he has been mostly interested in C++ library design and implementation related to Boost... Read More →


Monday September 8, 2014 9:15pm - 10:00pm PDT
Descartes
 
Tuesday, September 9
 

8:30pm PDT

The sqlpp11-connector experiment, Part 1

In order to let more people experience type safety and other compile time constraints when programming SQL in C++, more connectors for sqlpp11 are required. Currently there are connectors for MySQL/MariaDb, Postgresql and Sqlite3, as well as an experimental binding to std::vector.

I would like to use the opportunity of having so many capable people in one place to try to add a few more connector libraries. These libraries would not be finished by the end of the day, but there are pretty good chances to get the first few queries processed.

 

"The compile time query checks are brilliant." dirkvdb

sqlpp11 is an EDSL for SQL in C++, allowing you to write SQL queries in name- and type-safe manner. You can learn a lot about how it works and how you benefit from it in my talk on Thursday.

sqlpp11 is vendor neutral. In order to work with a database, it requires a connector library. Such libraries are available for MySQL/MariaDb, PostgreSQL, Sqlite3 and (experimental) std::vector.

I want to use the opportunity of having so many highly capable developers in one place: Lets write a few more connector libraries. These could be for SQL databases, like Microsoft SQL, Oracle, Firebird, MemSQL, DB2 etc. If you're feeling more adventurous, we could at least start writing connectors to other databases, e.g. incoming JSON streams, or we could improve on the connector to C++ standard containers.

I'll start with a short introduction about what a connector looks like and how it is typically structured. After that we start coding (in teams, maybe). I will provide a skeleton so that you don't have to worry less about structure and boiler plate. I am sure that we will be successfully processing the first queries with new connectors by the end of the session.

Anyone can participate. It would be helpful if you

  • bring a laptop
  • are able to compile sqlpp11 (this is known to work for gcc>=4.8 and clang>=3.1)
  • have a connector in mind you want to write/work on
  • have some knowledge and access to the documentation of the interface of the database for that connector

Speakers
avatar for Roland Bock

Roland Bock

Principal Software Engineer, PPRO Financial Ltd
From my days at the university, I hold a PHD in physics (although that was in the previous century and seems like a different life by now). Ever since then I have been developing software and/or managing engineering teams. In 2008, I started to learn C++ because I could not believe... Read More →


Tuesday September 9, 2014 8:30pm - 9:15pm PDT
Descartes

8:30pm PDT

Coupled Multi-Physics Simulations in the Exascale Era and Its Implications on C++17
Emerging programming models, and their implementations will benefit from taking a strong applications perspective when validating the true applicability of the proposed technical specifications of solutions such as C++17 proposed standard.  In order to provide an applications perspective to drive a vertically integrated discussion, as a context, the core data structures, algorithms and parallel programming model utilized by the open source Stanford SU2 multi-physics C++ based toolkit, will be described in detail.  The objective of  the proposed “Open-Content”  session is  to foster  a  lively holistic discussion intertwining  a realistic
application context around important emerging topics including pertinent to C++17 including:
•  Does C++17 TM proposal’s proposed productivity gains mitigate it’s performance implications?
•  Does C++17 sufficiently enable cache-conscious programming?
•  How does C++17 enable scalability and
•  What lessons can C++17 learn from the DARPA HPCS language efforts?

The numerical solution of systems of partial differential equations or “coupled-multi-physics” simulations, is an important  application  area  for  academic,  governmental  and  industry  organizations  in  the  science, engineering and medical communities.  These organizations often utilize large-scale computing platforms to solve ever larger and more complex modeling and simulation problems. Consequently, the games and film industry over the past decade has been rapidly increasing the scope and resolution of their simulation models to feed their ever increasing demand of visual realism in games and feature-film visual effects.
In the past, heterogeneity has largely been at the Node level (i.e. single blade), with communication from the CPU to the Accelerator (many-core CPU, GPU / FPGA / DSP, etc.) through the PCIe protocol and it’s variants. In the near future, socket-level communication technologies such as Intel’s KTI or the IBM CAPI / Nvidia NVLink protocol, will enable accelerators to become equal piers to the main CPU, dramatically reducing  latency of  communication.  By  the  2017  timeframe,  it  is  likely  that  Accelerators  will  be  fully
integrated into the main CPU. Furthermore, to address memory access latency, bandwidth and IO, a range of  memory  technologies  are  emerging  including:  DDR4  memory,  on-package stacked high-bandwidth memory  and  non-volatile  memory  (i.e.  memory-channel  /  Flash)  technologies.   Finally,  large-scale compute servers for public / private clouds will aggregate these technologies and likely introduce silicon nano-photonics interconnects, further reducing the latency of communication while increasing bandwidth.
As we approach the “exascale” computing systems we can imagine 100s of cores in a single chip, with aggregate capabilities of 10 ^18th power flops / second, or roughly 1,000 fold performance of current systems.

Today it  is  a  “un-spoken”  truth that when  practically  applying  scalable  systems  utilizing heterogeneous computing, a substantial amount of computing resources are often left under-utilized due to the in-effective utilization  of  the  memory  hierarchy by the applications,  their underlying  libraries,  programming  models and supporting system software and hardware.  Furthermore as the simulation problem size increases, and the  modeling  of  “dynamic  systems”  becomes  important,  unstructured  adaptive  methods  (enabling  a simulation-level-of-detail) will become more important. Subsequently, it is likely that these applications
will require pointer-based data structures, dynamic memory allocation and irregular parallelism.

Speakers
avatar for Yahya H. Mirza

Yahya H. Mirza

YCEO/CTO, Aclectic Systems Inc.
Yahya H. Mirza’s original background was aeronautical engineering and he was initially employed by Battelle Research Labs. His experience at NASA Ames in 1989, simulating the hypersonic aerodynamics of waveriders on the Cray- YMP, brought him to an important realization. A clear... Read More →


Tuesday September 9, 2014 8:30pm - 10:00pm PDT
Leibnitz

8:30pm PDT

Lightning Talks
Lightning talks - some 15 minutes, some 5 minutes. Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Moderators
avatar for Kate Gregory

Kate Gregory

Partner, Gregory Consulting
Kate Gregory has been using C++ since before Microsoft had a C++ compiler. She writes, mentors, codes, and leads projects, in both C++ and .NET, especially for Windows. Kate is a Microsoft Regional Director, a Visual C++ MVP, has written over a dozen books, and speaks at conferences... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Caves

Jonathan Caves

Developer, Microsoft Corporation
C++, Hiking, Opera, Beer - pick any three
avatar for Shy Shalom

Shy Shalom

Senior Software Engineer, Intigua
Wizard
avatar for Julian Smith

Julian Smith

Software Architect, Undo Software
Julian Smith is co-founder and Software Architect at Undo Software. He holds a physics degree from Oxford University and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Edinburgh. Along with co-founder and CEO Greg Law, Julian designed and developed Undo's patented record-and-rewind... Read More →
avatar for Peter Sommerlad

Peter Sommerlad

founder, Better Software: Consulting, Training, Reviews
Peter Sommerlad was director of IFS Institute for Software at FHO/HSR Rapperswil, Switzerland. Peter is co-author of the books POSA Vol.1 and Security Patterns and contributed to "97 things every programmer should know". His goal is to make software simpler and safer by Decremental... Read More →
MT

Martin Troxler

Senior Engineer, Komax AG
Programming in C++ since the early 90'. Responsible: - Development of realtime controller systems running on RT Linux for industrial manufacturing machines. Recent hot topics: - ReSTful server framework in C++ - (Unit) testing of new and legacy C++ code
avatar for Jeff Trull

Jeff Trull

Principal, Trull Consulting
Electronic CAD algorithmsModern C++ design patterns
avatar for Michael VanLoon

Michael VanLoon

Principal Software Engineer, F5 Networks
I have been developing software for over 30 years. Yes, I started before I was born. I have been doing C++ for over 20 years, not very well at first, and slightly better now. I work at F5 Networks, and have worked at Disney, VMware, Yahoo!, and Microsoft, among many others... Read More →
avatar for Jens Weller

Jens Weller

Meeting C++ / Community Organizer, Meetingcpp GmbH
Jens Weller has worked, since 2007, as a freelancer in C++, specialising in consulting, training and programming C++. He started with programming C++ back in 1998. He is an active member of the European C++ community and the founder of the Meeting C++ platform and conference. Jens... Read More →
avatar for Leor Zolman

Leor Zolman

Head Hacker, BD Software
Leor Zolman has been involved in system software/compiler development, system administration, application development, and education for 40 years, spanning the CP/M, UNIX, and Windows operating systems. Leor is the author of The BD Software C Compiler (“BDS C”, 1979), the first... Read More →


Tuesday September 9, 2014 8:30pm - 10:00pm PDT
Pascal

9:15pm PDT

Computer Book Publishing Today: The Seven Deadly Sins Revisited

Whether you're thinking about self-publishing, working with a traditional publisher, or exploring other options, deciding whether or not it makes sense to devote 2,000 hours of your life to writing a technical book is non-trivial question. Pearson Technology Group Executive Editor Gregory Doench will present an overview of the challenges and opportunities facing authors and publishers today. Starting with a snapshot of current market conditions, he will discuss critical success factors, as well as review mistakes and pitfalls to avoid. In addition, the seven questions you need to ask yourself before starting to write a book will also be explored.

He will be joined by Pearson colleagues Jennifer Bortel and Kim Boedigheimer for a Q&A session for anybody who would like to learn more about working with InformIT.com and Addison-Wesley.


Speakers

Tuesday September 9, 2014 9:15pm - 10:00pm PDT
Newton
 
Wednesday, September 10
 

8:00am PDT

Lightning Talks
Lightning talks - some 15 minutes, some 5 minutes. Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Moderators
avatar for Kate Gregory

Kate Gregory

Partner, Gregory Consulting
Kate Gregory has been using C++ since before Microsoft had a C++ compiler. She writes, mentors, codes, and leads projects, in both C++ and .NET, especially for Windows. Kate is a Microsoft Regional Director, a Visual C++ MVP, has written over a dozen books, and speaks at conferences... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Caves

Jonathan Caves

Developer, Microsoft Corporation
C++, Hiking, Opera, Beer - pick any three
avatar for Brett Hall

Brett Hall

Principal Software Engineer, Wyatt Technology
Brett is the lead developer on Dynamics, a data collection and analysis package developed at Wyatt Technology(http://www.wyatt.com/) for use with their light scattering instruments. He holds a PhD in Physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previous to joining Wyatt... Read More →
avatar for Michael VanLoon

Michael VanLoon

Principal Software Engineer, F5 Networks
I have been developing software for over 30 years. Yes, I started before I was born. I have been doing C++ for over 20 years, not very well at first, and slightly better now. I work at F5 Networks, and have worked at Disney, VMware, Yahoo!, and Microsoft, among many others... Read More →
avatar for Andy Webber

Andy Webber

Technologist, SIG


Wednesday September 10, 2014 8:00am - 8:45am PDT
Pascal

8:00pm PDT

The perils of strict-aliasing

Followon from the lightning talk, contributions from attendees welcome.

I think that a lot of intermediate C++ programmers may not be aware of the issue and there is a lot of outdated information online. 

My name is Andy Webber and I work at SIG which is a financial trading company near Philadelphia, PA.  I started learning C++ in high school and I’ve been hooked ever since.  I especially enjoy attempting to understand the full stack from the hardware up through high-level software.  Understanding strict aliasing has been my crusade of late.


Speakers
avatar for Andy Webber

Andy Webber

Technologist, SIG


Wednesday September 10, 2014 8:00pm - 8:45pm PDT
Leibnitz

8:30pm PDT

Real world reversible debugging for C/C++ developers on Linux

Anyone who's written in C++ or other compiled languages will have had to fix bugs. I'll be describing and demonstrating a debugging tool for Linux called UndoDB that will appear almost miraculous - it allows programs to be run backwards as well as forwards, allowing the root causes of bugs to be found with astonishing ease. UndoDB uses advanced optimization techniques to allow practical debugging of even very large and CPU-intensive programs, with typical slow-down of only 2-4x compared to 50,000x for gdb's process record.

In the Open Content session I'll be expanding on the details presented in the lightning talk to include a more in-depth look at the UndoDB technology and how it works, and will present a series of demos working with challenging real world examples. There will be time for an interactive Q and A session at the end of the talk.


Speakers
avatar for Julian Smith

Julian Smith

Software Architect, Undo Software
Julian Smith is co-founder and Software Architect at Undo Software. He holds a physics degree from Oxford University and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Edinburgh. Along with co-founder and CEO Greg Law, Julian designed and developed Undo's patented record-and-rewind... Read More →


Wednesday September 10, 2014 8:30pm - 9:15pm PDT
Newton

8:30pm PDT

The JUCE framework - creative C++ coding in large-scale applications

JUCE (Jules' Utility Class Extensions) is an all­encompassing C++ class library for developing cross­platform software. It contains a number of classes allowing to create standard applications, and is particularly well­suited for building audio and real­time applications. In addition to the classes, JUCE offers support for linking and managing libraries and dependencies with dedicated software, the Introjucer. The Introjucer creates templates for most popular compiler environments that make the compiling toolchain simpler and faster.  

Come and learn about JUCE: What is it? Who uses it? What do they use it for? How does it work? What exciting things are planned for its future? We'll present a short talk about a few of the library's noteworthy features, and invite the audience to join in with questions and opinions. We hope this session will be interesting for people who've never heard of JUCE, and also for those who use it every day!


Speakers
avatar for Julian Storer

Julian Storer

Developer, Tracktion
Jules is a developer and founder who has created several audio technologies and companies in his 20+ year career. He's best known for creating JUCE, Tracktion and SOUL.


Wednesday September 10, 2014 8:30pm - 9:15pm PDT
Descartes
 
Thursday, September 11
 

8:00am PDT

Lightning Talks
Lightning talks - some 15 minutes, some 5 minutes. Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Speakers
avatar for Roland Bock

Roland Bock

Principal Software Engineer, PPRO Financial Ltd
From my days at the university, I hold a PHD in physics (although that was in the previous century and seems like a different life by now). Ever since then I have been developing software and/or managing engineering teams. In 2008, I started to learn C++ because I could not believe... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Carpenter

Kevin Carpenter

Lead Project Engineer, E.P.X.
Previously I developed on Windows with MFC building applications that perform financial simulations. Now I get to see how fast I can make credit card transactions complete using Linux and Oracle. For hobbies I enjoy working with micro-controllers interfaced to the real world. Both... Read More →
avatar for Boris Kolpackov

Boris Kolpackov

Chief Hacking Officer, Code Synthesis
Boris Kolpackov is a founder and CHO (Chief Hacking Officer) at Code Synthesis, a company focusing on the development of open-source tools and libraries for C++. For the past 10 years Boris has been working on solving interesting problems in the context of C++ using domain-specific... Read More →
KN

Karl Niu

Program Manager, Microsoft Visual C++
I work on Microsoft's C++ language conformance efforts and IntelliSense in Visual Studio. I am also interested in type theory and language design.
avatar for Ken Smith

Ken Smith

Production Engineer, Facebook
I


Thursday September 11, 2014 8:00am - 8:45am PDT
Pascal

12:00pm PDT

Gamers/Interactive High Performance real time Bof

Are you interested in improving C++ to support Gaming, real time/interactive requirements, high performance/low latency or GPU/Accelerator graphics in C++? Meet Michael Wong at the top of the escaltor on the 2nd Floor and we will head to a private room at the Wild Ginger next door to have an informal BoF to discuss how I can represent this important C++ interest group. 


Speakers
MW

Michael Wong

OpenMP CEO/Architect, IBM/OpenMP
You can talk to me about anything including C++ (even C and that language that shall remain nameless but starts with F), Transactional Memory, Parallel Programming, OpenMP, astrophysics (where my degree came from), tennis (still trying to see if I can play for a living), travel, and... Read More →


Thursday September 11, 2014 12:00pm - 1:45pm PDT
Meydenbauer Center 11100 NE 6th St., Bellevue, WA 98004

8:30pm PDT

How one might build a compile time format library

: there are some interesting challenges that one may run into building a compile time format library. In specific, I want to share techniques to answer these questions.

1. How can we pass a constant expression to a metafunction and retain its const-ness? This is easy if the expression is an integral, it gets more difficult when we have types such as const char * or std::tuple.

2. Can we get reasonable error messages? I share a technique to use a combination of SFINAE and static_assert to get cleaner error messages. Namely, we don't want to see all the candidates of operator<<.

I hope you can join me to explore these techniques :)


Speakers
avatar for Michael Park

Michael Park

Software Engineer, Facebook
I'm a software engineer at Facebook, working on the C++ libraries and standards team. My focus for C++ is to introduce pattern matching to facilitate better code.


Thursday September 11, 2014 8:30pm - 9:15pm PDT
Leibnitz

8:30pm PDT

Software Transactional Memory, For Reals

Followon from the lightning talk, contributions from attendees welcome.

Software transactional memory has been referred to in some quarters as "just a research toy". But for the right type of application this appears not to be the case as we've been using it successfully in shipping software at Wyatt Technology for the past three years. I'll get into why I think it has worked so well for us.

Brett Hall is the lead developer on Dynamics, a data collection and analysis package developed at Wyatt Technology for use with their light scattering instruments. He also blogs about C++, among other things, at backwardsincompatibilities.wordpress.com. The rest of the time he is mostly hanging out with his family and/or riding a mountain bike on the trails around Santa Barbara.


Speakers
avatar for Brett Hall

Brett Hall

Principal Software Engineer, Wyatt Technology
Brett is the lead developer on Dynamics, a data collection and analysis package developed at Wyatt Technology(http://www.wyatt.com/) for use with their light scattering instruments. He holds a PhD in Physics from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Previous to joining Wyatt... Read More →


Thursday September 11, 2014 8:30pm - 9:15pm PDT
Newton
 
Friday, September 12
 

8:00am PDT

Lightning Talks
Lightning talks continued!

Moderators
avatar for Kate Gregory

Kate Gregory

Partner, Gregory Consulting
Kate Gregory has been using C++ since before Microsoft had a C++ compiler. She writes, mentors, codes, and leads projects, in both C++ and .NET, especially for Windows. Kate is a Microsoft Regional Director, a Visual C++ MVP, has written over a dozen books, and speaks at conferences... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael Caisse

Michael Caisse

Ciere Consulting
Michael Caisse has been crafting code in C++ for nearly 25-years. He is a regular speaker at various conferences and is passionate about teaching and training. Michael is the owner of Ciere Consulting which provides software consulting and contracting services, C++ training, and Project... Read More →
avatar for Marc Eaddy

Marc Eaddy

Software Architect, Intel
avatar for Lenny Maiorani

Lenny Maiorani

After bouncing around from startup to startup, I am now at Quantlab. I am developing networking applications on the cutting edge of performance using C++17 to get the most out of compile-time programming. I love tools from continuous integration to static analysis, performance analysis... Read More →


Friday September 12, 2014 8:00am - 8:45am PDT
Pascal

8:00am PDT

The sqlpp11-connector experiment, Part 2

In order to let more people experience type safety and other compile time constraints when programming SQL in C++, more connectors for sqlpp11 are required. Currently there are connectors for MySQL/MariaDb, Postgresql and Sqlite3, as well as an experimental binding to std::vector.

I would like to use the opportunity of having so many capable people in one place to try to add a few more connector libraries. These libraries would not be finished by the end of the day, but there are pretty good chances to get the first few queries processed.

We will continue to develop the connectors we started in Part 1. Depending on how far we got, there are several options, for instance

  • Support for prepared statements
  • Add connection pools
  • Turn off unsupported features at compile time
  • Add vendor specific SQL extensions to the EDSL, like hierarchical queries for Oracle for instance

I will give short introductions to these topics and help you with the implementation. Some of those will be challenging!

Since the overlap between topics is relatively small, several people could work on the same connector in parallel.


Speakers
avatar for Roland Bock

Roland Bock

Principal Software Engineer, PPRO Financial Ltd
From my days at the university, I hold a PHD in physics (although that was in the previous century and seems like a different life by now). Ever since then I have been developing software and/or managing engineering teams. In 2008, I started to learn C++ because I could not believe... Read More →


Friday September 12, 2014 8:00am - 8:45am PDT
Descartes

12:00pm PDT

Game Dev lunch / BoF

Since there are so few game devs I propose meeting at Rock Bottom for lunch 12-1:30 for an informal Bird of a Feather talk.


Speakers
RS

Remy Saville

programmer, Relic Entertainment


Friday September 12, 2014 12:00pm - 1:30pm PDT
Meydenbauer Center 11100 NE 6th St., Bellevue, WA 98004